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Cloaca Toilet Paper Roll, Wim Delvoye, 2007

300.00
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Cloaca Toilet Paper Roll, Wim Delvoye, 2007

300.00

The Super Cloaca toilet paper rolls by Wim Delvoye were produced for the retrospective exhibition and world premiere of Super Cloaca at Mudam Luxembourg in 2007 and sold only during the exhibition at the Wim Shop. Rolls are white toilet paper with blue printed Cloaca emblem. Five available, new and sealed. 

 

DIMENSIONS

4 in.H

10 cmH

DIAMETER

4.75 in. (12 cm)

 

Cloaca, Latin for sewer, is a digestive machine by the Belgian artist, Wim Delvoye. After eight years of research exploring the digestive process, the machine was unveiled at the Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst, Antwerp in 2000. During the exhibition's three month duration, someone would feed Cloaca lunch and dinner. The 33 foot long digestion aided by tubes and jars of gastric fluids would eventually, 22 hours later, result in excrement tested as similar to that of a human.

When asked about his inspiration, Delvoye has said that everything in modern life is essentially pointless and that he "like[s] the beauty of doing all this work for nothing.'' (Grimes, William. "Critic's Notebook; Down the Hatch." The New York Times. 30 Jan. 2002.)

7 minute youtube video  depicting the 2007 Wim Delvoye Cloaca exhibition. 

 

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The Super Cloaca toilet paper rolls by Wim Delvoye were produced for the retrospective exhibition and world premiere of Super Cloaca at Mudam Luxembourg in 2007 and sold only during the exhibition at the Wim Shop. Rolls are white toilet paper with blue printed Cloaca emblem. Five available, new and sealed. 

 

DIMENSIONS

4 in.H

10 cmH

DIAMETER

4.75 in. (12 cm)

 

Cloaca, Latin for sewer, is a digestive machine by the Belgian artist, Wim Delvoye. After eight years of research exploring the digestive process, the machine was unveiled at the Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst, Antwerp in 2000. During the exhibition's three month duration, someone would feed Cloaca lunch and dinner. The 33 foot long digestion aided by tubes and jars of gastric fluids would eventually, 22 hours later, result in excrement tested as similar to that of a human.

When asked about his inspiration, Delvoye has said that everything in modern life is essentially pointless and that he "like[s] the beauty of doing all this work for nothing.'' (Grimes, William. "Critic's Notebook; Down the Hatch." The New York Times. 30 Jan. 2002.)

7 minute youtube video  depicting the 2007 Wim Delvoye Cloaca exhibition. 

 

Inquire