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  • White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s

White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s

8,000.00
White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s on PHILOLUX and 1stdibs
White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s on PHILOLUX and 1stdibs
White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s on PHILOLUX and 1stdibs
White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s on PHILOLUX and 1stdibs
White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s on PHILOLUX and 1stdibs
White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s on PHILOLUX and 1stdibs
White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s on PHILOLUX and 1stdibs
White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s on PHILOLUX and 1stdibs
White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s on PHILOLUX and 1stdibs

White Freeform Wall Lamp in Metal and Brass extensible arm attributed to Louis Kalff for Cosack, Germany circa 1950s

8,000.00

Monumental German wall lamp by Cosack and attributed to Louis Kalff, 1950s. The white metal shade is organically free-form, nearly trumpet shaped. Two pivot points between the two arms allow a wide range of movement, the brass arm extending to 48". Refinished, powder coated in black and white.

 

    Dimensions

  •     21 in.Hx5 ft. 4 in.Wx13.5 in.D
  •     53 cmHx163 cmWx34 cmD

 

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Louis Kalff (born in Netherland,1897-1976) joined the advertising department of the Philips company in 1924 and soon became its art director. For the 1958 World's Fair, Louis Kalff was asked by Philips to build a pavilion that would be the synthesis of light, space, color and sound, such as never had been seen before. Louis Kalff hired le Corbusier to conceive the building, called “Poème électronique." It was one of the first immersive multimedia installations mixing spatialized sound, colorful light effects, projected films and electronics, all integrated into the architecture. Le Corbusier solicited the iconoclast, experimental, modernist French music composer, Edgard Varese, and Louis Kalff always supported this choice, against the opinion of Philips' direction. Le Corbusier was then assisted by the young Iannis Xenakis who built one of the first buildings with algorithms for this new kind experience. Over one and a half million visitors  experienced the "Poème électronique" during its 6 months duration at the World's Fair.

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Monumental German wall lamp by Cosack and attributed to Louis Kalff, 1950s. The white metal shade is organically free-form, nearly trumpet shaped. Two pivot points between the two arms allow a wide range of movement, the brass arm extending to 48". Refinished, powder coated in black and white.

 

    Dimensions

  •     21 in.Hx5 ft. 4 in.Wx13.5 in.D
  •     53 cmHx163 cmWx34 cmD

 

Inquire

 

 

Louis Kalff (born in Netherland,1897-1976) joined the advertising department of the Philips company in 1924 and soon became its art director. For the 1958 World's Fair, Louis Kalff was asked by Philips to build a pavilion that would be the synthesis of light, space, color and sound, such as never had been seen before. Louis Kalff hired le Corbusier to conceive the building, called “Poème électronique." It was one of the first immersive multimedia installations mixing spatialized sound, colorful light effects, projected films and electronics, all integrated into the architecture. Le Corbusier solicited the iconoclast, experimental, modernist French music composer, Edgard Varese, and Louis Kalff always supported this choice, against the opinion of Philips' direction. Le Corbusier was then assisted by the young Iannis Xenakis who built one of the first buildings with algorithms for this new kind experience. Over one and a half million visitors  experienced the "Poème électronique" during its 6 months duration at the World's Fair.